July 20, 2019

Second Wind in the House

first_imgby, Dr. Bill ThomasTweet10Share17Share4Email31 SharesSecond-Wind-BookstoreFor an author publication is something like a birthday. The little idea that wouldn’t let go, the idea that seemed to grow in your mind, the idea that became a book— is presented to the world.It is very exciting and also very frightening. You can pick the book up (it’s on the front table of all U.S. Barnes and Noble stores) and hold it and, like a baby, it feels so small and light. Also like a baby, your book will make its own way in the world. People will love it– or hate it. People will hand it to friends– or ignore it. No one can say what will happen because no one really knows. So happy birthday “Second Wind: Navigating the Passage to a Slower, Deeper, and More Connected Life.”My happiness is somewhat tempered by the changes that are remaking the world of books and publishing. If you care to look at the best selling books that have anything at all to do with aging, they are nearly all about “anti-aging.” Best-sellers are the domain of celebrities with breathless accounts of “anti-aging miracles.” The fact that Second Wind is a pro-aging book written by a (relatively) unknown author means that it is going to have a tough time getting started in the world.It is true that Second Wind was named in the top 10 nonfiction books of 2014 by Publishers Weekly. It is true that the book will be displayed at the entrance to every Barnes and Noble in America today (and many independent book stores). And yes it has been placed in thousands of libraries across America. Widespread distribution is one of the dwindling perks of having a big publisher. But that is not enough.Let me tell you where you won’t find Second Wind. You won’t see the book featured on This Morning or on Good Morning America. You won’t see it on The Daily Show. Oprah did not select it for her book club. In fact, I haven’t been invited to talk about Second Wind on any television program anywhere, let alone one with national reach.As the author of a book that explains why our society struggles against positive messages about aging I knew better than to expect our virulently ageist mainstream media to pay attention to, let alone promote, a book dedicated to exploring the hidden virtues of aging. My extraordinary team of publicists at Simon and Schuster hope to prove me wrong and have not given up pitching the book to national media. But I believe this book will have to find its audience the old-fashioned way– by word of mouth. We are going on the road with the The Second Wind Tour because we want to share its message with as many people as possible. We want to start a new conversation that is rich with possibilities.I now see myself as a writer AND a cultural critic AND an impresario of deeply authentic live experiences:I am a writer and I am proud of the Second Wind book and I do believe that it will help others reimagine their lives, their dreams.I am a critic of the relentless “adultification” of American society and remain dedicated to illuminating the virtues of life beyond adulthood.I am also the producer of a new kind of experience — I believe in the power of live “non-fiction” theater to share insights and, most importantly, help people understand why they so often feel that their lives are out of balance.This is not my dream alone. You can share this journey with me. You are invited to read the book and dispute, embrace and improve its arguments. You are invited to join us in 25 cities across America as we present a theatrical experience that celebrates the joy that comes with catching hold of life’s Second Wind.You are invited into a new conversation about life, growth and reimagination. And the conversation starts right here.The book is currently available for sale at many locations including amazon.comRelated PostsIntroducing The Second Wind TourLast summer I was taken by the feeling that the time was right to start a new conversation about why we so often feel that our lives are out of balance– and how we can restore that balance.What’s Your Best Books on Aging Reading List?In the time-honored tradition of year-end lists and gift ideas, I’m asking ChangingAging’s bloggers and audience to submit their personal Top 5 Books on Aging reading lists.Tribes of EdenIn the mid-1990’s I decided to write a book about aging. It was going to be a serious, deeply researched non-fiction book that would update the state of knowledge regarding aging. In the evenings, when I sat down to write this book — I had trouble concentrating. Instead of working…Tweet10Share17Share4Email31 SharesTags: publishing Second Wind Tour Simon and Schusterlast_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on Second Wind in the House,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

Whos Going to Create a Better Narrative of Old Age in America

first_imgTweetShare90ShareEmail90 SharesMost Americans aren’t optimistic about getting older, and think the source of the problem is aging itself. So do most policy wonks, framing population aging as a set of choices about how to care for an avalanche of “frail and needy elderly.” MIT’s Joseph F. Coughlin and I don’t share that myopia. His latest book, The Longevity Economy, is packed with big ideas about the “dramatic-yet-predictable” effects of the new longevity, which we think presents a remarkable opportunity to build a better old age. We also know that what stands between us and this brighter future is the culture itself. But he’s putting his faith in corporations to “do the right thing” while I envision a very different engine of change.Coughlin founded the MIT AgeLab, which “applies consumer-centered systems . . . to catalyze innovation across business markets,” so it’s not surprising that his approach to the longevity boom is market-driven. “It’s as though a whole new continent were rising out of the sea, filled with more than a billion air-breathing consumers just begging for products that fulfill their demands,” he writes. Soon, he predicts, “the world’s most advanced economies will evolve around the needs, wants, and whims of grandparents.” The products and technologies that emerge to meet those needs won’t just be highly profitable. By improving the quality of life of older Americans in countless yet-to-be-imagined ways, the book predicts, they will enlarge and enrich the way we experience old age itself. It’s a bold proposition, and it’s also misguided.What stands between us and this better old age?Why are companies failing to “wake up, smell the Ensure”—which, Coughlin points out, is pretty much Soylent marketed to olders—and start courting older consumers with all the fervor they currently lavish on millennials?” Because of “our very idea of old age [emphasis mine], which is socially constructed, historically contingent and deeply flawed.”  “Socially constructed,” as I often say, is sociology-speak for “we make it up,” and we’re in synch when Coughlin declares “Old age is made up” [emphasis his].Not made up like a fun game, made up like a shared delusion. Call it a “collective case of blindness” as Coughlin does. Call it “implicit bias—prejudice so deeply ingrained that you might not even know you harbor it—against older people is the norm across age groups,” as he also describes it. Call it “ageism,” as I do, and why Coughlin fails to is beyond me;  the word barely appears in The Longevity Economy. But although our approaches differ, we agree on the heart of the problem: an ageist culture that confines olders to the margins of society and sanctions only the blandest of “age appropriate” behaviors: relaxing, volunteering, grandparenting, and falling apart.Who’s going to drive the necessary social change?Not olders themselves, Coughlin writes, “because their ability to picture new, better ways to live is utterly constrained by our current, pernicious narrative.” The drivers, he says, will be the corporate visionaries who understand that olders aspire to the same stuff as everyone else does—work, romance, purpose, imagine that!—and create the products that enable those aspirations. “By building a vision of late life that is more than just a miserable version of middle age, companies won’t just be minting money . . . they’ll also be creating a cultural environment that values the contributions of older adults.” The result will create a virtuous circle: by enriching and enlarging our vision of late life, better products will bring it about.I love Coughlin’s vision of “a new narrative of possibility in old age,” but I don’t think it’s going to emerge from the business community. Corporations can speed social change, and they can definitely commodify it, turning sisterhood into grrl power into the Spice Girls, for example. But they exist to profit, not provoke, and it’s easy to monetize fear and insecurity. Who says wrinkles are ugly? The multi-billion-dollar anti-aging skincare industry. Who says perimenopause and “low T” and mild cognitive impairment are medical conditions? The trillion-dollar pharmaceutical industry. Why would corporations be instrumental in overturning prejudices from which they profit on this scale?So I stumble over Coughlin’s belief that “More than any other factor, this new story [of old age] will be built on the testimony of longevity-economy products.” Really? A seismic cultural shift driven by consumer behavior? The longevity economy will bequeath us lists of service providers and garages full of tools and toys. But olders want to downsize, and products will have to be both indispensable and affordable in order to reach a mass market.  More importantly, products alone cannot transform the world in which we use them. For-profit ventures aren’t in the better-life-for-everyone business because the masses lack the disposable income to power wholesale culture change. If the goal is to go beyond meeting older people’s basic needs—to support growth and voice and visibility for all, lifelong—how do we develop the rituals, roles, and institutions that will be essential to achieving that goal? Why would we trust the private sector to start operating in the interests of the entire cohort, not just those in the 9.9%? (See this piece in TheAtlantic about the “new American aristocracy.”)A consumer revolution requires a social revolutionWe know that as time grows shorter, purpose becomes an ever-higher priority. As Coughlin observes, “Culture helps determine what older people find meaningful. And that raises a question: can . . . new, socially permissible routes to meaning open up?” Of course they can: look at the effect of the women’s movement on women’s lives around the world! Whether global or local, whether revolutionary or reactionary, social movements challenge our notion of what’s “normal,” equitable, and possible, and in the process transform society. The technology- and consumption-driven revolution described in The Longevity Economy cannot take place without a mass movement to raise awareness of ageism and to end it.Changing the culture is hard, and it involves struggle. That struggle doesn’t start in a shopping cart, whether online or at Walmart. It starts between our ears, with the uncomfortable task of confronting our own, largely unconscious, age bias. It’s internalized ageism that keeps olders away from senior centers “because of all the old people there—I’m not like them.” (That and the fact that an ageist society doesn’t fund adequate, attractive, age-integrated gathering places.) Paired with ableism, ageism keeps olders from using walkers or wheelchairs because of the stigma, even when it means never leaving home. The same toxic combo scares off potential subscribers to the Village-to-Village aging-in-place movement, as Coughlin observes, because of “a serious perception barrier preventing people—even those evidently quite happy to join a service explicitly for older adults—from seeing themselves in a club designed to provide care for its oldest and frailest.”Those “perception barriers” are based on fear and shame, the grotesque notion that to age is to fail. We’re going to stay mired in age shame until we take off our collective blinders and acknowledge, out loud and together, what we know to be true: that age enriches us. We’re not going to put these fears in perspective—to acknowledge, for example, that aging well and living with disability can and do coexist—without a shift in cultural values. That won’t happen without mass political action that provokes society-wide upheaval, because the dominant culture will push back hard, as it does against anything that threatens the status quo. A shift in consumer behavior isn’t going to do it. We need people in the streets, not waiting for the free market to rescue us or carry the ball.From the personal to the political. (And back. And back again…)Change begins with consciousness-raising, the tool that catalyzed the women’s movement. (Here’s a link to Who Me, Ageist? A Guide to Starting A Consciousness-Raising Group.) Women came together in the 1970s, compared stories, and realized that the obstacles they were facing—not getting heard, or hired, or respected—weren’t personal misfortunes but widely shared political problems that required collective action. Social change occurs only as we take that awareness out into the world and directly and explicitly confront the ageism that diminishes and segregates older Americans in every arena.“The new, bespoke narrative of old age will emerge organically from our jobs as consumers. It will fit like a tailored suit,” Coughlin writes. Corporations are indeed going to do well by those of us who can afford tailors. There will be robots to hoist and help us, lovely communities to shield us from isolation, implants to enhance our senses (thank you, brand new cornea)—but only for those of us who can afford them. We can’t achieve equity without addressing the ways in which age intersects with race, class and gender. The movement needs to be much broader in order to bring about the richer and better old age that  we all hope to lives long enough to enjoy.Who gets this better old age?Coughlin does acknowledge, almost in passing, that “we’re staring at a possible future in which the gift of extra years of life is diverted straight to the wealthiest people in the world,” Possible? In a historic and shameful reversal, lifespans in the U.S. are in decline, largely among poor white women. A 2017 report by the United Nations found growing numbers of Americans living in extreme poverty. The engine of that disparity is unfettered capitalism. The modern welfare state was born in response to that disparity, lifting millions out of poverty in the wake of the Great Depression. That safety net has since been shrunk, and all the cuts that late-stage capitalism requires in order to stay viable, including the current tax bill, promise to shred it further.Capitalism is at best indifferent to the welfare of vulnerable populations, and more typically hostile to it. Pitting “disposable workers” against each other keeps salaries low, and the less economically productive people at both ends of the age spectrum are especially at risk. Gender disadvantages. Companies continue to pay women less than men and promote them less often, because it helps the bottom line and because they can still get away with it. Racism and homophobia also enter in. Older workers of color are most at risk for unemployment, with older African American men twice as likely to be unemployed as older white men, and LBGT olders fare even worse. Corporations are no more going to fix ageism than they’re going to fix racism or sexism.Closing the inequality gap and moving towards age equity means “changing the fundamental rules of old age,” Coughlin writes. I couldn’t agree more, and technology and innovation will indeed help older Americans stay healthy and connected. But at best his proposal is a subset of the solution. At worst it’s a band-aid on the gaping wound of deep economic inequality and a dangerous distraction from the radical action necessary to catalyze real social change. A better life for older people means valuing human beings lifelong, independent of their ability to consume or produce. That’s a better world for everyone, only a grassroots social movement will bring it about, and it is underway.Originally published on This Chair RocksRelated PostsThe Genius of Aging CampaignConfusing Average Lifespan With LongevityConventional wisdom has us believe that marvelous advances in modern medicine have lead to dramatic extensions of the average human lifespan and that even more dramatic bio/medical advances leading to near immortality are just around the corner. But do these claims hold up to scrutiny?The History of Old Age – A BeginningI have recently begun a new project, one that will probably go on for a long time before I feel finished. It is, as the headline states, to study the history of old age. It’s going to be a lot…TweetShare90ShareEmail90 SharesTags: Ageism growing old old agelast_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on Whos Going to Create a Better Narrative of Old Age in America,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

AJ Henning Wolverine

first_imgA.J. Henning (image via Tinley Junction) Frankfort (IL) Lincoln-Way East wide receiver A.J. Henning publicly committed to Michigan on Wednesday. He picked the Wolverines over offers from Alabama, Georgia, Notre Dame, Ohio State, and Penn State, among others. TTB Rating: 89 (ratings explanation) Tags: 2020 recruiting, A.J. Henning, Frankfort (IL) Lincoln-Way East Overall, I don’t know if Henning will have a 1,300-yard season like Gallon did, because Gallon was a star wide receiver on a team that didn’t have many other true wide receiver options (Drew Dileo was #2 among wide receivers with 16 catches in 2014). Henning will join a team in 2020 that could potentially still have Nico Collins, Tarik Black, and Donovan Peoples-Jones, though it’s unlikely that all three will return next year. Regardless, Henning should be a very good piece of the puzzle in the wide receiver room. Michigan now has seventeen commitments in the 2020 class. Michigan currently has three straight #1 prospects from the State of Illinois signed/committed (Trevor Keegan in 2019, Henning in 2020, McCarthy in 2021). Henning would be the first football player to come to Michigan from Lincoln-Way East. Michigan has been hard after Henning since April of 2018. For a long time, it seemed like he was Notre Dame-bound. But the longer his recruitment drew out without a commitment to the Fighting Irish, it seemed like that was a good thing for Michigan. When 2021 quarterback J.J. McCarthy committed to Michigan, that pushed the needle further in the Wolverines’ direction, since the two are friends; their schools are approximately 40 minutes apart. Henning has taken several visits to Ann Arbor, and the official visit this past weekend sealed the deal. Henning is not blazingly fast (neither was Gallon) on the football field, and the fear for some might be that a player listed at 5’9″ will get bested by taller defensive backs (such was the fear about Gallon).center_img RATINGSESPN: 4-star, 84 grade, #17 WR, #105 overallRivals: 4-star, 5.9 grade, #3 APB, #84 overall247 Sports: 4-star, 93 grade, #26 WR, 127 overall  2 0You need to login in order to vote I’m coming home… 100% C O M M I T T E D pic.twitter.com/WTPUKbmyOQ— AJ H3nning (@AJHenning3) June 26, 2019 A month ago I made the comparison of Henning to Jeremy Gallon over on MGoBlog (LINK), and it seems like a lot of people have latched on to that comparison since then. The unique thing about Gallon was that, despite his lack of size (5’7″, 185 at the NFL Combine), he won all kinds of jump ball and physical battles. Henning is listed as an all-purpose back by Rivals, and even though I don’t think he’ll play any running back (other than maybe lining up in the backfield on occasion to mess with the defense), he plays like a running back. He plays with good body lean (like Gallon) and can break tackles (like Gallon) and can gain extra yards after contact (like Gallon). You also see Henning do a great job of catching the ball in traffic (like Gallon) and high-pointing the ball (like Gallon). Hit the jump for more. Henning is 5’10” and 183 lbs. He has run a 10.6 in the 100 meters. He claims a 4.46 forty, a 4.08 shuttle, and a 37″ vertical.last_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on AJ Henning Wolverine,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

New studies use proteomics to shed light on pathogenic mechanisms

first_img Source:http://www.asbmb.org/ May 11 2018Recent studies in the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics have shed light on pathogenic mechanisms of the sexually-transmitted parasite Trichomonas vaginalis and the HIV-associated opportunistic lung fungus Aspergillus.Fatty acid addition lets a parasite stickTrichomonas vaginalis, commonly known as trich, is the most common curable sexually transmitted disease, and the vast majority of people with the disease – upwards of 70 percent – do not experience symptoms, according to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. However, the protozoan parasite can increase an infected person’s risk of contracting HIV or developing cancer, and can cause preterm labor in pregnant women. In other parasites, a protein modification called palmitoylation, the addition of a 16-carbon saturated fatty acid to cysteine residues of a protein, regulates infectivity. In a new paper in the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, researchers at the Instituto Tecnologico de Chascomus in Buenos Aires, and the University of California, Los Angeles, enriched palmitoylated proteins from T. vaginalis and found numerous palmitoylation sites in pathogenesis-related proteins. Yesica Nievas and colleagues report that disrupting palmitoylation reduced the protist’s self-aggregation and adhesion to host cells. This work establishes the importance of palmitoylation in T. vaginalis proteins for infection and suggests that palmitoylation enzyme inhibitors may help treat the infection.Related StoriesStudy: HIV patients continue treatments if health care providers are compassionateScientists discover hundreds of protein-pairs through coevolution studyHIV therapy leaves unrepaired holes in the immune system’s wall of defenseHow a fungus outfoxes the macrophageAspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic pathogen in the lung. People with compromised immune systems, either from disease or immune-suppression therapy, are especially vulnerable to the airborne mold spores, called conidia. In a healthy person, macrophages in the alveoli take up the fungus and normally an acidic organelle called the phagolysosome destroys it. Conidia from A. fumigatus, however, disrupt acidification of the phagolysosome and prevent the infected macrophage from committing suicide through apoptosis. Researchers at the Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology in Germany investigated the immune evasion strategies the pathogen uses by infecting cultured macrophages with magnetically tagged Aspergillus conidia from a virulent strain or a less infectious mutant strain. Hella Schmidt and colleagues then extracted phagolysosomes from macrophages infected with each strain and compared their proteomes. In a paper in the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, the team reported that the more virulent strain reduces maturation of the phagolysosome and proinflammatory immune signaling. These disruptions ensured that the more virulent strain had a comfortable place to survive inside the host.last_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on New studies use proteomics to shed light on pathogenic mechanisms,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

Osteoporosis drug may be cardioprotective in hip fracture patients

first_imgMay 11 2018The osteoporosis drug alendronate was linked with a reduced risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack, and stroke in a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study of patients with hip fractures. The association was seen for up to 10 years after fracture.In the study, patients newly diagnosed with hip fracture from 2005 through 2013 were followed until late 2016. Among 34,991 patients, 4602 (13%) received osteoporosis treatment during follow-up.Alendronate was associated with 67% and 45% lower risks of one-year cardiovascular death and heart attack, respectively. It was associated with an 18% reduced risk of stroke within five years and a 17% reduced risk of stroke within 10 years. Protective effects were not evident for other classes of osteoporosis treatments.Related StoriesRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaHeart disease is still the number 1 killer in Australia, according to latest figuresWeightlifting is better for the heart than cardio”It is well established that there is a world-wide crisis in the treatment of osteoporosis, due to patients’ awareness of the extremely rare side effects,” said senior author Dr. Ching-Lung Cheung, of the University of Hong Kong. “Our findings show that alendronate is potentially cardioprotective in hip fracture patients.Therefore, physicians should consider prescribing alendronate or other nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates to hip fracture patients soon after their fracture, and patients should also have good compliance with alendronate treatment, as this is not only good for your bones, but also your heart.”In addition to clinical management, the study also has important implications in clinical trial design of anti-osteoporosis medications. The US Food and Drug Administration recently requested more data before reaching a decision on whether to approve the osteoporosis drug romosozumab, due to excess cardiovascular adverse events in the romosozumab arm compared with the alendronate arm. “In light of these important deliberations, our results suggest that such differences in cardiovascular adverse events could be potentially related to a protective association of alendronate, rather than an increase in cardiovascular adverse events related to romosozumab use, said Dr. Cheung.” Source:http://newsroom.wiley.com/press-release/osteoporosis-drug-may-benefit-heart-healthlast_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on Osteoporosis drug may be cardioprotective in hip fracture patients,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

Kite collaborates with Gadeta to develop novel gamma delta TCR therapies for

first_img Source:http://www.gilead.com/news/press-releases/2018/7/kite-and-gadeta-announce-strategic-collaboration-to-advance-gamma-delta-t-cell-receptor-technology-for-solid-tumors Jul 19 2018Kite, a Gilead Company, and Gadeta B.V., a privately-held company focused on the discovery and development of novel cancer immunotherapies based on gamma delta T cell receptors (TCRs), have entered into a strategic collaboration to develop novel gamma delta TCR therapies in various cancers. Under the financial terms, Kite will provide research and development (R&D) funding for the collaboration and Gadeta will be eligible to receive future payments upon achievement of certain regulatory milestones. In addition, Kite will make an upfront purchase of equity in Gadeta from Gadeta’s shareholders and may acquire additional equity in Gadeta upon achievement of certain R&D milestones. Kite will have the exclusive option to acquire Gadeta.Related StoriesExciting study shows how centrioles center the process of cell divisionNew study reveals ‘clutch’ proteins responsible for putting T cell activation ‘into gear’Alternate cell growth pathway could open door to new treatments for metastatic cancersGadeta has developed a proprietary technology to engineer alpha beta T cells with gamma delta TCRs, called TEGs, for the potential treatment of various hematological cancers and solid tumors. This platform has the potential to combine the advantages of conventional T cells, which express alpha and beta TCR chains, with TCRs derived from gamma delta T cells that recognize novel targets in cancer cells, according to preclinical models evaluating the lead TEG candidates. Unlike alpha beta T cells, gamma delta TCRs do not require expression of cell surface proteins (major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules) for target recognition, and their ability to recognize novel targets under stress or metabolic conditions offer an attractive approach to develop potentially effective cell therapies in solid tumors.Gadeta was founded in 2015 by Professor Jürgen Kuball, Mark de Boer, Utrecht Holdings and Medicxi, its founding investor.”We continue to invest in research approaches that support the development of innovative cell therapies for people living with cancer,” said Alessandro Riva, MD, Gilead’s Executive Vice President, Oncology Therapeutics & Head, Cell Therapy. “We are excited to work with Gadeta on its gamma delta TCR technology. This research collaboration adds an additional new platform to our current capabilities in research and cell manufacturing, and deepens our commitment to develop novel approaches to treat solid tumors.””Our mission is to develop novel gamma delta TCR cell therapies that have the potential to benefit patients with cancer,” said Shelley Margetson, Gadeta’s Chief Executive Officer. “We are excited to gain the support of a leader in the cell therapy field, which has seen the potential of our platform and products to redefine cancer therapy.”last_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on Kite collaborates with Gadeta to develop novel gamma delta TCR therapies for,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

Maternal stress increases anxious and depressivelike behaviors in female offspring

first_imgAug 16 2018A study in Biological Psychiatry examines the effects of maternal cortisol levels on brain connectivity and behavior in offspringHigh maternal levels of the stress hormone cortisol during pregnancy increase anxious and depressive-like behaviors in female offspring at the age of 2, reports a new study in Biological Psychiatry. The effect of elevated maternal cortisol on the negative offspring behavior appeared to result from patterns of stronger communication between brain regions important for sensory and emotion processing. The findings emphasize the importance of prenatal conditions for susceptibility of later mental health problems in offspring.Interestingly, male offspring of mothers with high cortisol during pregnancy did not demonstrate the stronger brain connectivity, or an association between maternal cortisol and mood symptoms.”Many mood and anxiety disorders are approximately twice as common in females as in males. This paper highlights one unexpected sex-specific risk factor for mood and anxiety disorders in females,” said John Krystal, MD, Editor of Biological Psychiatry. “High maternal levels of cortisol during pregnancy appear to contribute to risk in females, but not males.”Related StoriesStudy explores the effects of near-miss experiences associated with 9/11 terrorist attacksDogs and cats relieve academic stress and lift students’ mood, according to a new studyOxidative stress could play key role in the spreading of aberrant proteins in Parkinson’s disease”This study measured maternal cortisol during pregnancy in a more comprehensive manner than prior research,” said first author Alice Graham, PhD, of Oregon Health & Science University. To estimate the overall cortisol level during pregnancy, senior author Claudia Buss, PhD, of Charité University Medicine Berlin and University of California, Irvine and colleagues measured cortisol levels over multiple days in early-, mid-, and late-pregnancy. Measurements taken from the 70 mothers included in the study reflected typical variation in maternal cortisol levels. The researchers then used brain imaging to examine connectivity in the newborns soon after birth, before the external environment had begun shaping brain development, and measured infant anxious and depressive-like behaviors at 2 years of age.”Higher maternal cortisol during pregnancy was linked to alterations in the newborns’ functional brain connectivity, affecting how different brain regions can communicate with each other,” said Dr. Buss. The altered connectivity involved a brain region important for emotion processing, the amygdala. This pattern of brain connectivity predicted anxious and depressive-like symptoms two years later.The findings reveal a potential pathway through which the prenatal environment may predispose females to developing mood disorders. The study supports the idea that maternal stress may alter brain connectivity in the developing fetus, which would mean that vulnerability for developing a mood disorder is programmed from birth. This could be an early point at which the risk for common psychiatric disorders begins to differ in males and females.Source: https://www.elsevier.com/last_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on Maternal stress increases anxious and depressivelike behaviors in female offspring,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

Building a better tomato

first_imgAll light and no night makes the tomato a dull, sickly fruit. If commercial varieties of tomato plants are exposed to 24-hour-a-day light, as they sometimes are in a greenhouse, their leaves become mottled with yellow spots, as in the photo above, and the plants can die. Now, researchers have discovered that a gene that makes a protein called CAB-13, which plays a role in photosynthesis, also boosts tomatoes’ tolerance for round-the-clock exposure to light. This little-studied gene is prevalent in wild varieties of tomatoes but is mutated in most commercial varieties, rendering them vulnerable to continuous illumination, the team notes. When the researchers bred some domestic tomatoes with their wild kin for several generations and restored the gene’s function, the resulting varieties were tolerant of 24-hour light, they report online today in Nature Communications. Some of the new plants even thrive under it, producing 20% more tomatoes when grown under 24-hour light as opposed to cycles of 16 hours of light and 8 hours of darkness. The finding, besides offering opportunities for researchers to develop novel strains of light-tolerant, more bountiful tomatoes, may help scientists better understand the biochemical processes involved in photosynthesis.last_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on Building a better tomato,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

Baby corals and fish smell their way to the best home

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Emailcenter_img You know the story: Kids leave home to explore the world, eventually settling down in the greenest pastures they can find. But when these restless youngsters are baby fish and coral larvae, how do they choose the best place to make their new home? New research suggests that these creatures smell their way to neighborhoods where the living is good. Scents emitted by certain species of adult corals draw fish and coral larvae to healthy reefs, while the noxious odor of out-of-control seaweed drives them away from damaged ecosystems.“These are fantastic results,” says Jelle Atema, a chemical and behavioral ecologist at Boston University. The findings demonstrate “dramatic differences” in coral or fish behavior, he says, and “how important chemical signals are in regulating the interactions between corals and seaweeds and fishes.”Young fish and coral larvae are cast out into the open ocean after they are born, to swim or float away on currents to new ecosystems. Some eventually return to their spawning grounds—especially if their hometown happens to be in a protected marine habitat—while others settle elsewhere. But these days, many fish and coral larvae are finding themselves with limited options: More and more unprotected reefs have been taken over by seaweed, which smothers coral, disrupts food webs, and perhaps even poisons potential settlers. Both fish and coral larvae have been observed navigating away from those degraded reefs and toward healthy ecosystems. This behavior is particularly surprising for coral larvae, says Mark Hay, a chemical marine ecologist at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) in Atlanta. A baby coral is “a bag of snot with some cilia around it. How could it go one place and not another?”Hay and fellow Georgia Tech biologist Danielle Dixson decided to investigate. First, they collected water from marine protected areas with healthy reefs off the coast of Fiji and from nearby unprotected reefs where seaweed had taken over. Back in the lab, they used those samples to infuse the chemical signature of each potential habitat to create areas in a flume tank with currents running through it that “smelled” like each type of ecosystem. Then they gave fish and coral larvae collected from Fijian coastal waters a choice: Would they swim toward an area spiked with the scent of a healthy reef, or toward an area that smelled like seaweed? Would they be able to tell the difference based on smell alone?It turned out they could. Even in the absence of actual adult corals and seaweed, coral larvae were four to five times more likely to swim toward the sweet-smelling “neighborhoods” than the more putrid smelling seaweed-dominated waters from less healthy systems, the team reports online today in Science. Meanwhile, young fish gravitated to the healthy-smelling waters four to eight times more than to the seaweed-scented areas.Similar results were seen in the field, where researchers set up temporary populations of live coral, algae, and seaweed species, a mere 100 meters apart. The young corals in particular studiously avoided the noxious seaweed: “There’s a blanket of stink on the bottom over there and they just won’t go through,” Hay says. The most attractive environment for coral larvae by far proved to be a combination of adult coral and crustal coralline algae; adding the scent of algae to the plates in the field increased settlement rate by 1600% compared with the controls. What’s more, surveys of Fiji’s protected reefs showed five to eight times more new fish recruits than in unprotected reefs nearby.“Any one of those experiments alone would be pretty cool, but the combination is just incredible,” says Nancy Knowlton, a coral reef expert from the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., who was not involved in the research. Combining lab and field experiments paints a “much more realistic” view of the power of smells in the water, she says. “They [the corals and seaweed] are obviously changing the whole chemical ecology of the water around the reef.”Knowlton says she is pleased to see that the research also points to low-cost tools for restoring reefs. Perhaps parrotfish, which like to munch on seaweed, could be given a reprieve from commercial fishing; their increased population could help control the seaweed and its nasty odor with little help from humans. Fishermen could also plant adult corals from attractive species—or even add a dash of crustose coralline algae—to attract more young fish and coral larvae to degraded areas, something like real estate agents baking cookies before an open house to make a home seem more attractive.Reefs face increasing pollution and ocean acidification, along with rising temperatures in a changing world, and for the past decade researchers have been full of gloom and doom, says Robert Steneck, a coral reef ecologist at the University of Maine’s Darling Marine Center in Walpole. He, too, is happy to see these results, noting that these suggested management techniques could start a positive trend. As more and more fish and coral settled in these formerly undesirable neighborhoods, the reef would start generating healthy smells on its own, attracting even more species and eventually restoring the damaged reef to its former glory.last_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on Baby corals and fish smell their way to the best home,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

Science gets a nod in Obamas immigration plans

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email President Barack Obama’s big speech last night on immigration policy included several nuggets of interest to the research community—including moves that will make it easier for foreign students studying at U.S. universities to gain a temporary work permit, and for Chinese and Indian researchers who already have U.S. work permits to change jobs and apply for permanent residency.But to the disappointment of the high-tech industry, Obama stopped short of using his executive power to address what they say is a chronic shortage of permits for highly-skilled foreign workers. That step, White House officials say, would require Congress to pass legislation that has been bottled up in the U.S. House of Representatives.In the meantime, Obama followed through on a threat to take unilateral administrative steps because Congress hasn’t acted. The big news was a series of policy changes to enable some 4 million undocumented immigrants to avoid deportation, at least for the remaining 2 years of the administration. But Obama also announced policies, to be finalized over the next 4 months, which he said will “make it easier and faster for high-skilled immigrants, graduates, and entrepreneurs to stay and contribute to our economy, as so many business leaders have proposed.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img “Are we a nation that educates the world’s best and brightest in our universities, only to send them home to create businesses in countries that compete against us?” he added. “Or are we a nation that encourages them to stay and create jobs here, create businesses here, create industries right here in America?”The United States wants them to stay here, Obama emphasized in announcing his plans.One change would expand an existing program that enables foreign students studying science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) at U.S. universities to work full time while on a student visa (such visas typically bar employment). Some 120,000 students, including at least 25,000 in STEM fields, participated in the Optional Practical Training (OPT) program in 2013, according to government statistics. OPT currently allows students to work full time for up to 29 months, with approval from their institution.Now, immigration officials will develop new rules “to expand the degree programs eligible for OPT and extend the time period and use of OPT for foreign STEM students and graduates,” according to a 20 November memo from Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Charles Johnson. But in a nod to controversy surrounding the OPT program, including criticism that universities weren’t adequately monitoring adherence to the rules, and that it takes jobs away from native-born workers, Johnson also ordered officials to “improve” oversight rules and “safeguard the interests of U.S. workers in related fields.”Johnson’s memo also sets out plans to make it easier for multinational companies to move workers from foreign facilities to U.S. operations, and simpler for immigrants who already have U.S. work permits to shift to “same or similar” jobs. “This guidance should make clear that a worker can, for example, accept a promotion to a supervisory position or otherwise transition to related jobs within his or her field of endeavor,” Johnson wrote. The Obama administration also wants to make it easier for spouses of workers holding certain types of H-1B visas—which are common in the high-tech industry—to gain the ability to work.Researchers from India and China, who face an especially long wait for visas as a result of current rules, could see particular benefits from the new policies, says immigration attorney Mark Harrington of the Harrington Law Firm in Houston, Texas. One visa issuance change, for example, should make it easier for workers to file a form—called an I-485—that is needed to transition from a temporary work permit to a permanent residency permit, or green card. Now, he says, Indian and Chinese workers may have to wait years to file that paperwork because of backlogs in the system. Under new rules, they’ll be able to file the I-485 immediately after approval of their National Interest Waiver (NIW) petition, even though, because of the backlog, they may not get the visa for years. And filing an I-485 has major benefits, he adds: You can get a work authorization, so you’re no longer bound to a particular employer. Your spouse can get one, too. And traveling gets easier, since you no longer have to renew your visa at the embassy. Less concrete but also promising for foreign researchers is a move to make it easier for “certain non-citizens with advanced degrees or exceptional ability” to receive NIWs. The waiver allows holders “to seek green cards without employer sponsorship if their admission is in the national interest,” according to Johnson’s memo. “This waiver is underutilized and there is limited guidance with respect to its invocation,” Johnson wrote. He asked the agency to clarify the rules “with the aim of promoting its greater use for the benefit of the U.S economy.”  The administration also would offer “parole status” to immigrants who haven’t yet qualified for a national interest waiver, allowing “inventors, researchers, and founders of start-up enterprises … who have been awarded substantial U.S. investor financing or otherwise hold the promise of innovation and job creation” to temporarily start work in the United States. To qualify, applicants would have to meet certain “income and resource thresholds,” which have not yet been set.Harrington says that under the Obama administration, immigration cases involving efforts to obtain NIWs have been “brutal”; they should get easier under these new guidelines.Such moves are drawing positive, albeit muted, reviews from high-tech industries that recruit high-skilled foreign workers. They had hoped Obama would do more. Some labor unions, scholars and professional groups, meanwhile, remain worried that that opening any gates to more foreign high-skilled workers will depress wages and reduce job possibilities for native-born scientists and engineers.*Clarification, 25 November, 11:45 a.m.: The paragraph dealing with I-485 requests has been revised to clarify their relationship to the National Interest Waiver process. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on Science gets a nod in Obamas immigration plans,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

Genetically engineered microbes make their own fertilizer could feed the worlds poorest

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Nocera lab, Harvard University Genetically engineered microbes make their own fertilizer, could feed the world’s poorest Email Radishes fed fertilizer by microbes in the soil (right) grow larger than their counterparts without the bugs. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA—Industrial fertilizers help feed billions of people every year, but they remain beyond the reach of many of the world’s poorest farmers. Now, researchers have engineered microbes that, when added to soil, make fertilizer on demand, producing plants that grow 1.5 times larger than crops not exposed to the bugs or other synthetic fertilizers. The advance, reported here this week at a meeting of the American Chemical Society, could help farmers in the poorest parts of the world increase their crop yields and combat chronic malnutrition.A key component of fertilizer is nitrogen, an element essential for building everything from DNA to proteins. Nitrogen is all around us, comprising 80% of the air we breathe. But that nitrogen is inert, bound up in molecules that plants and people can’t access. Some microbes have evolved proteins called nitrogenases that can split apart nitrogen molecules in the air and weld that nitrogen to hydrogen to make ammonia and other compounds that plants can absorb to get their nitrogen.The industrial process for making fertilizer, invented more than a century ago by a pair of German chemists—Fritz Haber and Carl Bosch—carries out that same molecular knitting. But the Haber-Bosch process, as it’s now known, necessitates high pressures and temperatures to work. It also requires a source of molecular hydrogen (H2)—typically methane—which is the chief component of natural gas. Methane itself isn’t terribly expensive. But the need to build massive chemical plants to convert methane and nitrogen into ammonia, as well as the massive infrastructure needed to distribute it, prevents many poor countries from easy access to fertilizer.center_img By Robert F. ServiceApr. 4, 2017 , 2:15 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe A few years ago, researchers led by Harvard University chemist Daniel Nocera devised what they call an artificial leaf that uses a semiconductor combined with two different catalysts to capture sunlight and use that harvested energy to split water molecules (H2O) into H2 and oxygen (O2). At the time, Nocera’s group focused on using the captured hydrogen as a chemical fuel, which can either be burned directly or run through a device called a fuel cell to produce electricity. But last year, Nocera reported that his team had engineered bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to feed on the H2 and carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air and combine them to make hydrocarbon fuels. The next step, says Nocera, was to broaden the scope of their work by engineering another type of bacterium to take nitrogen out of the air to make fertilizer.Nocera and his colleagues turned to a microbe called Xanthobacter autotrophicus, which naturally harbors a nitrogenase enzyme. But they still needed a way to provide the bugs with a source of H2 to make ammonia. So they genetically engineered Xanthobacter, giving them an enzyme called a hydrogenase, which allows them to feed on H2 to make a form of cellular energy called ATP. They then use that ATP, additional H2, and CO2 from the air to synthesize a type of bioplastic called polyhydroxybutyrate, or PHB, which they can store in their bodies.This is where the microbes’ nitrogenase enzyme kicks in. The bacteria harvest H2 from their PHB store and use their nitrogenase to combine it with nitrogen from the air to make ammonia, the starting material for fertilizer. It doesn’t just work in the lab: Nocera reported yesterday at the meeting that when he and his colleagues put their engineered Xanthobacter in solution and used that solution to water radish crops, the vegetables grew 150% larger than controls not given either the bugs or other fertilizers.Leif Hammarström, a chemist at Uppsala University in Sweden who also works on making fuels from solar energy, says he was impressed with the work. Making ammonia without using an industrial process “is a very challenging chemistry,” he says. “This is a good approach.” It may even be one that could help many of the world’s poor. Nocera says Harvard has licensed the intellectual property for the new technology to the Institute of Chemical Technology in Mumbai, India, which is working to scale up the technology for commercial use around the globe. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on Genetically engineered microbes make their own fertilizer could feed the worlds poorest,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

A successful cancer researcher confronts a new challenge getting elected to Congress

first_img A successful cancer researcher confronts a new challenge: getting elected to Congress Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The science candidates: races to watch in 2018 A Democrat, Westin is hoping to unseat longtime Republican incumbent John Culberson. Democrats view the seventh district, which includes Rice University and affluent neighborhoods on Houston’s west side, as a ripe target because it went narrowly for Democrat Hillary Clinton in 2016 after previously supporting Republican presidential nominees Mitt Romney and John McCain by large margins in the 2012 and 2008 presidential contests, respectively.But before Westin can run against Culberson in the November general election, he must beat out six other candidates for his party’s nomination. Three have raised considerably more money, a conventional metric to judge a candidate’s viability, and a fourth is banking on name recognition from having made three previous runs at Culberson. And Culberson, who chairs a spending subcommittee that sets the budgets for several federal science agencies, is not without his own considerable resources, including the backing of a national Republican Party desperate to retain his seat.Indeed, even one of Westin’s staunch supporters is not-so-silently hoping the researcher won’t win and abandon his quest to treat—and one day cure—lymphomas. Westin would “do a fantastic job [in Congress], but he’s grossly overqualified for what goes on in Washington, [D.C.,]” says R. Eric Davis, an associate professor at MD Anderson who partners with Westin on cancer clinical trials. If Westin stays in cancer research, Davis says, “I think he could go on and become a thought leader in the field. There are so many other people who could do a good job without disrupting their careers.”Davis, whose political views are more conservative than Westin’s, isn’t being selfish. He’s just being a scientist. Productive, early career researchers like Westin traditionally have been loath to take such a leap into politics. But Westin, a physician who says he chose cancer research because it represented the greatest unmet need, believes that he can have an even bigger impact on society by serving in Congress. And he is hoping that 2018 is the right time for him to make that switch.A flurry of facts“I’m a 40-year-old father of three, a cancer doctor, and an award-winning researcher from MD Anderson; I deal with facts every day in my job.” That’s how Westin introduced himself to the 400 people who showed up last month at an elementary school on a rainy Saturday for a candidates’ forum on climate change. “My first commercial describes how I will stand up to [President Donald] Trump and his attacks on science. … When I’m in Congress I’ll use facts and science to fight back for us.”That style was much in evidence at the forum. It was well-suited to the format, in which Daniel Cohan, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Rice University, posed a series of questions to the candidates on energy and environmental issues and demanded short, concise answers. And for better or worse, Westin used his responses to separate himself from the others at the table.When asked how to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from automobiles, for example, most candidates talked about the need for more public transit and how to get people out of their cars. One even tried to blame their Republican opponent, asserting that “It’s not a technical problem, it’s a John Culberson problem.”Not Westin. “Seventy percent of our oil goes to transportation—cars and planes. We use 15 billion barrels a day, that’s $2 billion,” he explained. And he was just getting started. “When you drive your car, 85% of the gas you put in it is wasted, and only 5% is used to move the car forward,” he continued. “We can dramatically improve fuel efficiency by making our cars lighter, including the greater use [of] carbon fiber, which is also stronger than metal. I agree we need better public transportation. But in Houston we all know public transportation isn’t available. And we’re a driving state. So, we need to use new technology to get our cars better prepared for the 21st century.”Another question from Cohan, about increasing federal funding for climate and energy research, gave Westin a chance to display both his knowledge and his credentials. “I think this is one of the most important questions facing the country,” he began. “Are we going to be a global leader in technology, or are we going to move backwards? As a scientist, I’m uniquely qualified to discuss this.”After mentioning the funding he’s received from the National Institutes of Health, he cited data to rebut Trump’s proposals to cut federal research spending. “For every dollar the government invests in basic research, it produces a return on investment of $8.37,” Westin asserted. “We’re actually living longer and more productive lives as a result of that research, which generates $3.2 trillion every year to drive our economy.” Email Starting this month, ScienceInsider will be following the 2018 U.S. elections, which have attracted unusual interest from the scientific community. Dozens of candidates with backgrounds in science, technology, engineering, and math are seeking election to Congress, and hundreds more are running for state and local offices. We will be profiling candidates and reporting on news from the campaign trail.This story is the first in a three-part series about three Texas candidates with scientific backgrounds who are running for the U.S. House of Representatives as Democrats. The primary is 6 March.As a clinical oncologist at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas, Jason Westin tries to help his patients cope with their deadly disease by being both honest and upbeat with them. He’s taking the same approach as a first-time candidate for the U.S. Congress: He accepts the long odds and steep learning curve, but he can also see a path to victory. Jason Westin, who until recently ran clinical trials testing treatments for lymphoma, hopes to claim the Democratic nomination to challenge the veteran Republican incumbent, John Culberson (TX). Jason Westin campaign Westin’s full-throated embrace of science sent the other candidates scrambling to keep up. “I’m a scientist, too, just a political scientist,” said one, to audience laughter. Another confessed, “I’m not a scientist, but I’m married to a scientist.” One candidate even called for restoring the Office of Technology Assessment, a nonpartisan arm of Congress created in 1972 to analyze scientific developments that was eliminated in 1995 after Republicans gained control of the House of Representatives.The prospect of flipping the seventh district from Republican to Democratic control has energized the party faithful and opened their wallets. Westin, for instance, had raised $389,000 by the end of 2017, an impressive total for a political newcomer. At the same time, it’s far less than the other top-tier candidates, who average $750,000. But second place may be good enough: If nobody receives a majority of the voters cast in the primary, the two top finishers will compete in a 22 May runoff.Westin has won the endorsement of 314 Action, a nonprofit group formed in 2016 with the goal of getting more scientists and engineers elected to local, state, and national offices. The organization says its support is based on its assessment of a candidate’s viability, judged mainly by the professionalism of the campaign and the size of its war chest.The group’s endorsement “is a way to verify my credentials,” Westin says. Such a stamp of approval can help him raise more money, he adds—a necessary evil for a candidate to be taken seriously. “It’s critical for me to do adequate fundraising to get my message out to voters,” he says. “There are so many things happening in the world these days, it’s hard to get their attention. So, fundraising is a key part of the campaign.”Treating the body politicWestin grew up in Florida and received both his undergraduate and medical degrees from the University of Florida in Gainsville. He did his residency at the University of North Carolina (UNC) in Chapel Hill. He tacked a year onto his residency so he could be in step with his wife’s career as an obstetrician-gynecologist; during that time he helped create a department of hospital medicine at UNC. He started a clinical fellowship at MD Anderson in 2008 and joined the faculty in 2011.Westin launched his campaign last spring, and by the fall he had handed over management of his clinical trials—most recently testing the efficacy of a combination of three drugs used to treat large B-cell lymphoma—to colleagues. He’s also reduced his clinical hours to 1 day a week, leaving him 6 days a week to campaign. The schedule allows him to continue to practice medicine without running afoul of rules governing political activity by state employees. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Meet the scientists running to transform Congress in 2018 Jason Westin campaign “So, I still work at MD Anderson, and I’m not on leave,” he explains. “If I had taken leave and continued to get paid, it would effectively mean that the state of Texas was paying me to run for Congress.”When he’s in the clinic, Westin says the needs of his patients come first. Even so, many want to talk about his campaign, and he says sometimes the patient-doctor relationship overrides their party affiliation. “I’ve had several patients tell me, ‘You’ll be the first Democrat I’ll be supporting in a couple of decades.’”Westin believes that his medical training will make him a more effective legislator. “Doctors don’t have the luxury of endlessly debating something,” he says. “When a patient comes to see you, you have to analyze the available facts, even if it’s not complete, come to a conclusion and explain it to them, and then act. And that’s something that I think would serve our political system well, in having more people who are trying to get things done.”The Republican members of Congress who are doctors also possess those skills, Westin acknowledges. And he’s surprisingly generous is explaining how, given similar backgrounds and training, they can take stances that he strongly opposes, such as repealing the Affordable Care Act or dismissing the role of humans in climate change.“I don’t think we want a Congress where everybody thinks the same way and every vote is unanimous,” he says. “That’s not healthy for our democracy. So I think having doctors with different backgrounds and perspectives is healthy.”A life-long Democrat, Westin says he’s too busy at work to discuss politics with colleagues, but he suspects that the 35 to 40 members of the center’s aggressive lymphoma team hold a range of political views. That’s certainly the case for Davis, who came to MD Anderson in 2009 and began his collaboration with Westin 2 years later. “When I was young I was a Republican,” says Davis, who grew up in South Carolina and worked as a pathologist before making a midcareer move into bench science. “Then I became an anti-Democrat. And now I’m an anti-Republican.”Westin has said repeatedly that he plans to return to MD Anderson if his bid for Congress is unsuccessful. But Davis isn’t so sure.“So if he doesn’t win,” Davis speculates, “I think he’ll ask himself, ‘Why didn’t I win?’ And if he thinks that it just takes time to gain recognition, and that maybe next time more people will know him, then who knows. He has so much going for him—he’s photogenic, he’s got a family, he’s at MD Anderson, [and] he’s got people like me who praise him to the hilt.” Jason Westin at the March for Science in Washington, D.C., with his spouse, Shannon, and their children.  The science vote Follow our rolling coverage of 2018’s science candidates. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Jeffrey MervisFeb. 23, 2018 , 12:35 PMlast_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on A successful cancer researcher confronts a new challenge getting elected to Congress,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

Heres why the outcomes of this weeks European elections are good news

first_imgThe European Parliament’s debating chamber in Strasbourg, France On international cooperation, Jørgensen expects the new Parliament to support the European Commission’s “open to the world” approach, which seeks to develop scientific collaborations with countries outside Europe and allows nonmembers such as Norway, Switzerland, and Israel to compete in research funding programs in exchange for an association fee. “So many progressive MEPs have been elected on that ‘open society’ ticket”—as opposed to the nationalist and “Europe first” discourses of populist parties, he says.Far-right and euroskeptic parties did score high in countries such as Italy and France, but the predicted populist flood didn’t materialize across the continent. (The two main euroskeptic groups combined would go from 78 MEPs in the outgoing Parliament to 112 after the elections, whereas the European Conservatives and Reformists lost 18 seats.) But scientists and their institutions should remain vigilant about their influence, says Maud Evrard, head of policy affairs at the Brussels-based Science Europe, a group of funding agencies and research organizations.“We’re concerned about academic freedom. We shouldn’t take it for granted,” she says. (In Hungary, the government of Viktor Orbán has taken aim at Central European University, a private institution in Budapest, for instance.) “We will push the Parliament to promote and defend freedom of expression, freedom of assembly and thought” at the national level, Evrard says, as well as evidence-based policymaking.Parliament’s exact balance of power will be decided in the coming weeks; 29 MEPs are not allied to any existing political group yet. At its first plenary session in July, Parliament will then vote to elect the next president of the commission, who is put forward by the European Union’s heads of state and government. They will assemble a new commission, the European Union’s executive arm, including a commissioner for research and innovation to succeed Carlos Moedas from Portugal. The new Parliament will have a chance to grill the candidate for that post—and reveal its science policy inclinations—after the summer. Although populist and euroskeptic parties grew in last week’s elections for the European Parliament, the tsunami that EU supporters feared didn’t happen. That comes as a relief to many scientists, because several of the populist movements now on the rise in Europe appear to have little interest in science, flirt with antiscientific ideas, or have tried to curtail academic freedom.Observers in Brussels expect the new Parliament to continue its policy of defending generous research budgets. But the rise of pro-European Union green and liberal groups—at the expense of the Parliament’s traditionally two dominant parties—could lead to small shifts in science and technology priorities, some say, such as greener policies.The elections’ direct influence on EU science policy is limited because most of the details of Horizon Europe, its next 7-year research funding program, have already been agreed to by the outgoing Parliament and member states. But the new members of Parliament (MEPs) still have to negotiate two big items: the program’s budget from 2021 to 2027, which could be about €100 billion, and rules for the participation of countries outside of the European Union. Next year, Parliament will also examine rules for big public-private partnerships on research and innovation. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Thomas Jørgensen, European University Association Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country According to provisional results published yesterday, the biggest winner is the centrist Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe, which would add 40 MEPs to its current 69, whereas the greens would grow from 52 to 69 MEPs. The biggest losers are political groups that have long dominated European politics: the conservative European People’s Party and the socio-democrats, which would lose 36 and 39 seats, respectively. Voter turnout was at its highest since 1994, at about 51%.Liberals and greens will now have more clout to push their already articulate research agendas, says Thomas Jørgensen, senior policy coordinator at the European University Association in Brussels. “You have these research veterans in the Parliament; almost all of them are conservative,” Jørgensen says, alluding, for example, to MEPs Jerzy Buzek from Poland and Christian Ehler from Germany, who have focused much of their careers on research and innovation policy. “Now, there could be space for a liberal or green research champion, giving broad support to research and pushing for climate and sustainability issues.” By Tania RabesandratanaMay. 28, 2019 , 3:55 AM Now there could be space for a liberal or green research champion … Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Here’s why the outcomes of this week’s European elections are good news for science DAVID ILIFF (CC-BY-SA 3.0) last_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on Heres why the outcomes of this weeks European elections are good news,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

NIH should ask both institutions and investigators to report sexual harassment findings

first_img To combat sexual harassment in biomedical research, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) should ask grant applicants directly whether they have been found guilty of sexual harassment and require institutions to tell NIH about any such findings, as well as investigations. Those recommendations were released today by a working group advising NIH about how to bolster its policies in this hot-button area.The group also urged NIH to help victims of sexual harassment rebuild their careers, and it called for the Bethesda, Maryland–based agency to give trainees more independence from their mentors. NIH Director Francis Collins welcomed the advice. “I’m happy the recommendations are quite bold,” he said after a presentation to his Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD). But, he added, much remains to be fleshed out, including what legal constraints the agency faces in following through.Mounting concerns about sexual harassment in science have prompted research agencies to examine their policies. The National Science Foundation (NSF) last fall began to require that institutions report when a principal investigator (PI) has been found guilty of sexual harassment. But although NIH has expressed concern, apologized to victims, and added a new way to report allegations, it has held off on new policies—instead appointing a working group that in February began to explore possible changes. NIH should ask both institutions and investigators to report sexual harassment findings, advisory group says Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Jocelyn KaiserJun. 13, 2019 , 9:30 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The working group today issued four interim recommendations. The first is that sexual harassment be treated “as seriously as research misconduct.” That would not mean adding it to the federal definition of research misconduct (now defined as fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism) but instead establishing “parallel mechanisms.”In particular, NIH should require that institutions tell the agency about investigations and findings involving any kind of professional misconduct—including sexual harassment—within 1 week of an investigation’s start or a finding being issued. NSF’s new policy requires reporting about any harassment findings and any administrative actions that have been taken in connection with a harassment allegation, such as putting the investigator on leave. The report also recommends NIH set up a hotline for reporting sexual and other misconduct and work with other agencies to develop standard operating procedures for responding to investigations and findings.A second recommendation is to require PIs and co-PIs to “attest” on grant applications and progress reports that they have not violated and will not violate their institution’s code of professional conduct. A specific question might ask whether the applicant has been found guilty or been involved in a settlement involving sexual harassment or other misconduct within the past 7 years.A third recommendation is that NIH “recapture lost talent,” for example by encouraging sexual harassment survivors to apply to programs that help researchers restart their careers after dropping out for reasons such as having a baby. Finally, NIH should make more training awards directly to individual trainees, rather than to institutions or mentors; the idea is that if trainees have greater control over their financial support, they have greater power in the PI-trainee relationship, and less to lose if they report or push back against harassing behavior.Some members of the ACD questioned how the 7-year self-reporting limit was set. The working group didn’t want a PI to be “branded for life,” explained working group co-chair and NIH Associate Director for Science Policy Carrie Wolinetz. Others noted that PIs who commit research misconduct are often barred from receiving federal grants for 3 years, but sometimes the ban is for life.The appropriate time limit is one issue the working group will look at before it issues a final report in December, said co-chair Kristina Johnson, chancellor of the State University of New York system. Another is whether staff on a grant who are not a PI or co-PI should also be covered by the proposed policies.The working group did not discuss what NIH should do in response to reports of sexual harassment findings or investigations, which would go to staff but not study sections. “It’s going to be up to staff to figure out” how to respond, Collins said. NIH officials say implementing some of the recommendations could require a formal rulemaking process; the agency has previously said that hurdle prevented it from adopting NSF’s reporting policy. One prominent #MeTooSTEM activist was pleased with the report. “There are a lot of good things about these recommendations,” says BethAnn McLaughlin of Vanderbilt University in Nashville. One is that NIH would be more directly involved in sanctioning PIs who commit sexual harassment instead of leaving such actions to universities.McLaughlin also finds “hugely inspiring” new data that NIH shared disciplinary actions involving sexual harassment. In February, the agency said that in 2018 in response to 28 incidents, 14 PIs had been replaced on grants and institutions had disciplined 21 PIs; two people had been removed as peer reviewers. So far this year, NIH said it has received 31 inquiries involving 27 investigators and removed five PIs from grants, and 19 from peer review.Cases involving NIH’s own staff have also gone up: In 2018, the agency reviewed 35 allegations, formally disciplined 10 staff members, and informally disciplined 10 staff members. Since January, NIH has reviewed 171 allegations and taken actions against seven staff formally, and 27 informally.*Clarification, 14 June, 3:20 p.m.: The description of NSF’s sexual harassment policy has been clarified. Lydia Polimeni/National Institutes of Health Emaillast_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on NIH should ask both institutions and investigators to report sexual harassment findings,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

Update In reversal science publisher IEEE drops ban on using Huawei scientists

first_img The New York City–based Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) told editors of its roughly 200 journals yesterday that it feared “severe legal implications” from continuing to use Huawei scientists as reviewers in vetting technical papers. They can continue to serve on IEEE editorial boards, according to the memo, but “cannot handle any papers” until the sanctions are lifted.On 15 May, the U.S. Department of Commerce added Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. and its affiliates to a list of companies for which a license is required before U.S. technology can be sold or transferred. The department can refuse to grant such a license, issued by the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), if it deems that any sales or transfers would harm U.S. national security interests. U.S. officials have alleged that the Chinese government could use equipment manufactured by Huawei, which is a global supplier of cell phones and wireless data networks, to spy on users or disrupt critical infrastructure.Huawei scientists can continue to engage in a range of society activities, explains a 22 May IEEE statement to members. They can attend IEEE-sponsored conferences and make presentations, submit articles to IEEE journals, and participate in leadership and governance bodies to which they belong.What they can’t do as an employee of a company on the BIS entity list is be given access to the type of technical information that would be part of a research article. Specifically, IEEE says they “cannot receive or access materials submitted by other persons until after IEE has accepted the material for publication.” At that point, Huawei scientists “may act as editor or peer reviewer for that material.”The IEEE ban has sparked outrage among Chinese scientists on social media. “I joined IEEE as a Ph.D. student because it is recognized as an International academic platform in electronics engineering,” wrote Haixia (Alice) Zhang of Peking University in Beijing in a letter to IEEE leadership. “But this message is challenging my professional integrity. I have decided to quit the editorial boards [of two IEEE journals] until it restores our common professional integrity.”On 29 May IEEE “clarified” its response to the listing of Huawei. Here are excerpts from that statement: By Jeffrey MervisJun. 3, 2019 , 12:15 PM Update: In reversal, science publisher IEEE drops ban on using Huawei scientists as reviewers IEEE complies with U.S. government regulations which restrict the ability of the listed Huawei companies and their employees to participate in certain activities that are not generally open to the public. This includes certain aspects of the publication peer review and editorial process.However, all IEEE members, including those employed by Huawei, can continue to participate in individual membership, corporate membership and voting rights; subscribe to and access IEEE’s digital library and other publication products; submit technical papers for publication; participate in and present at IEEE-sponsored meetings and conferences, and may sponsor and accept an IEEE award. Members affiliated with Huawei may also participate in business, logistics, and other meetings including those related to conference planning.Huawei and its employees can continue to be a member of the IEEE Standards Association, including earning or exercising the voting rights of membership; attend IEEE standards development meetings, submit new proposals for standards, and participate and comment in public discussions of standards technology proposals.Should the U.S. government clarify the application of the EAR [Export Administration Regulations] with respect to peer review we will further advise the IEEE community. *Update, 3 June, 12:15 p.m.: On 2 June, IEEE lifted its ban on using Huawei scientists as journal reviewers, saying it had received “clarification” from the U.S. Department of Commerce on how the government’s recent actions against the company affect its peer-review process.Here is our original story from 29 May:A major scientific society has banned employees of Huawei, the Chinese communications giant, from reviewing submissions to its journals because of U.S. government sanctions against the company. Email *Update, 30 May, 9:03 a.m.: This story has been updated with a statement from IEEE.center_img Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg/Getty Images Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) A Huawei Technologies booth at the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, earlier this year. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on Update In reversal science publisher IEEE drops ban on using Huawei scientists,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

The First Choice to Play the Original Predator Monster was…Van Damme

first_imgNow an action movie legend, Jean Claude Van Damme’s introduction to Hollywood wasn’t exactly glamorous. To his surprise he found himself encased in a monster suit on the set of Arnold Schwarzenegger’s classic Predator. Yes, JCVD was set to be the original Predator monster, and it wasn’t the dreadlocked death machine audiences know today.Colored bright red, this early version of the Predator resembled a praying mantis that had been dipped in paint.FX supervisor Steve Johnson was interviewed by the Stan Winston School of Character Arts in 2014 and recalled the reaction of the “Muscles from Brussels.”Van Damme in Paris at the French premiere of The Expendables 2 in 2012. Photo by Georges Biard CC BY-SA 3.0Van Damme “thought he was going to show his martial arts abilities to the world… We got him in at lunch and you could see his eyes through the rubber muscles of the neck and he’s like, ‘I hate this head. I hate it. I hate it. Hate it.’”Johnson had his reservations from the moment the concept drawings were spread out in front of him. “What they needed was a character with backward bent reptilian legs, extended arms and a head that was out here and they wanted to shoot on the muddy slopes of Mexico in the real jungles. It was virtually physically impossible to do. I told them it wouldn’t work.” He was proved right, and Van Damme was eventually sent home.Arnold Schwarzenegger on the set of Predator. Photo by Sunset Boulevard/Corbis via Getty ImagesJohnson’s interview with the Stan Winston School happened because Winston’s talents helped turn the Predator into the frightening foe audiences know today.The inspiration for the final look came from an emerging director Winston was working with named James Cameron.Whilst sitting on a plane together, the FX maestro was trying to come up with a concept. Cameron threw in the idea of mandibles and the rest is history.The production team behind Aliens, James Cameron and Gale Ann Hurd. Photo by Towpilot CC BY-SA 3.0The pair teamed up for Aliens (1986), which had the luxury of an established and terrifying monster. A sequel to Alien (1979), Cameron and Winston simply built on the distinctive, Gothic world designed by H.R. Giger.However when 20th Century Fox were first putting the xenomorph flick together, one prospective director had a very different image in mind for the scary antagonist.Producer Walter Hill spoke to Mike Garris of the WTF podcast last year, where he shed some light on a surreal moment in Alien’s development.Veteran helmer Robert Aldrich, known for intense offerings such as What Ever Happened To Baby Jane (1962), was in the running to put the crew of the Nostromo through their paces.Kevin Peter Hall on the set of Predator. Photo by Sunset Boulevard/Corbis via Getty ImagesAccording to Hill, “He said, ‘we’ve gotta come up with something really unique.’ And he said… ‘I don’t know, just off the top of my head…. this may not be a good idea but… maybe we could get, like, an orangutan… and shave it’ – And we were going, ‘God almighty. That’s one we hadn’t thought of!’”This uniqueness led to Aldrich passing the baton to Ridley Scott, who put his own stamp on the chilling space opera.If the monkey trainers had had their way, things would have been very different. Thankfully these kinks were ironed out in the run up to shooting, unlike the situation with Predator.Cameron in February 2010. Photo by Steve Jurvetson CC BY 2.0Once Cameron’s suggested mandibles were in place, the spiky-toothed human hunter went on to further exploits, the most recent of which (The Predator) has just been released. Viewers also witnessed the Alien v Predator franchise, leading to the return of Ridley Scott for prequel entries Prometheus and Alien: Covenant.As for Van Damme, he went onto happier times. Ironically his complaint during Predator that he looked “like a superhero” was given a weird twist, thanks to his starring role in Cyborg (1989). The low budget actioner was shot on sets originally intended for a Spider Man movie.Read another story from us: “Halloween” reboots with a brand new sequel starring Jamie Lee CurtisMovies and monsters have had a profitable relationship over the decades. Though sometimes in the process of creating the perfect foe, the production encounters an uncontrollable monster all of its own.Steve Palace is a writer, journalist and comedian from the UK. Sites he contributes to include The Vintage News, Art Knews Magazine and The Hollywood News. His short fiction has been published as part of the Iris Wildthyme range from Obverse Books.last_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on The First Choice to Play the Original Predator Monster was…Van Damme,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

High School Production of Alien goes Viral

first_imgIn space, no-one can hear you scream, but there was certainly much applause for a high school production of Alien. Staged by the Drama Club at North Bergen High School in New Jersey, it boasted performances, detailed sets, and costumes that have turned the show from a local curiosity to a worldwide sensation. The offbeat and ambitious choice of material has earned rave reviews, with photos and footage circulating on social media. Parents proudly posted lovingly-recreated sequences, such as the infamous egg opening in which Kane (played by John Hurt in the 1979 movie) is attacked by the iconic face-hugger.American actress Sigourney Weaver with director Ridley Scott on the set of his movie ‘Alien’. Photo by Twentieth Century Fox Film Corpo/Sunset Boulevard/Corbis via Getty ImagesIt wasn’t long before celebrities joined the conversation. Adam Savage (Mythbusters) loved what he saw and tweeted some praise. Elijah Wood (Lord Of The Rings) and Rosario Dawson (Daredevil) also showed support.The Governor of New Jersey Phil Murphy pitched in. But the best was yet to come when the official @AlienAnthology account commented, “We are impressed!”Naturally, the school budget didn’t stretch to a multi-million dollar price tag. The Guardian writes that “costumes and sets were made largely from recycled materials.”Ridley Scott on the set of ‘Blade Runner’. Photo by Sunset Boulevard/Corbis via Getty ImagesEven so, the homemade experience blew people away, with The Hollywood Reporter commenting that they “appear to be almost exact replicas of those from the Ridley Scott film that spawned a massive franchise.”BBC News refers to “airlock doors with moving parts and the so-called ‘space jockey’ — the lone pilot of a derelict spaceship, which the Nostromo crew investigates.” The notorious “chest-burster” scene was accomplished with a hand puppet.The idea to bring the legendary xenomorph to New Jersey was the brainchild of director Perfecto Cuervo who, together with art director Steven Defendini, realized this would be a true challenge. Recalling his words to Cuervo, Defendini said in The Guardian, “I don’t even know if that is a thing that is possible but if the students are engaged, then I think we can make it happen, however, we make it happen.”A model of a Xenomorph from the ‘Alien’ film franchise. The model is made by NECA.The pair raided their bank accounts to plow approximately $3,500 into the feature-length play, which ran for two nights in March. Around 20 students were involved and the group even shot a trailer.To further create the right ambiance, the actual film was projected behind the stagebound action, giving audiences the opportunity to compare and contrast scenes like the exciting climax. In this, heroine Ripley (Sigourney Weaver’s classic role) ejects the creature into space.North Bergen is described as “one of the most underfunded schools in the entire state”, making the achievement even more of an eye-opener. For Cuervo and Defendini the experience is all about inspiring young minds and broadening horizons.“I think the best thing for us was that we showed the kids, and the kids kind of pieced it together themselves, that you can really make something out of nothing,” Defendini remarked.North Bergen High School. Photo by Luigi Novi CC BY 3.0As for the official franchise, Alien grew from relatively humble beginnings into a movie phenomenon. The alien’s distinctive design was the work of Swiss artist H.R. Giger, who together with visionary director Scott crafted a nightmare with an enduring legacy.Following three sequels, the alien locked horns with another sci-fi horror favorite for the Alien vs. Predator series. Scott then returned to the concept for prequels Prometheus (2012) and most recently Alien: Covenant (2017). An animated series based on the game Alien: Isolation is streaming online.H.R. Giger, photographed in July 2012. Photo by Matthias Belz CC BY-SA 3.0James Cameron, who directed Aliens in 1986, is currently working with Neill Blomkamp (District 9) on a new installment based on the latter’s concept. This reportedly ignores Alien³ onwards, creating an alternate timeline.Read another story from us: Can You Dig It? New Shaft Movie Combines 3 Generations of the Iconic DetectiveThe original movie celebrates its 40th anniversary this month, making the play an unexpectedly poignant tribute. And if North Bergen High think this is the end for Alien: The Play, they’re wrong. Because the Mayor is talking about reaching into the coffers for extra performances, meaning this could be a cult classic in the making.last_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on High School Production of Alien goes Viral,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

July 19, 2019

Hong Kong Protesters say storming of legislature born of desperation

first_imgBy AP |Hong Kong | Published: July 5, 2019 7:57:42 am Post Comment(s) Advertising Clashes break out as Hong Kong protesters escalate fight in suburbs Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence “We’ve got nothing to lose at all,” Nick said. “That’s why we start to fight back.” Hong Kong, Hong kong news, Hong Kong protest, Hong Kong legislature attack, Hong kong parliament attack, Hong Kong parliament protest, democracy protests Hong Kong, Hong Kong China, China Hong Kong, World news, Indian Express FILE – In this July 2, 2019, photo, police officers stand guard near a broken glass outside Legislative Council building in Hong Kong. Hundreds of protesters swarmed into Hong Kong’s legislature Monday night, defacing portraits of lawmakers and spray-painting pro-democracy slogans in the chamber before vacating it as riot police cleared surrounding streets with tear gas and then moved inside. (AP)That morning, Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam had clinked champagne glasses in a televised ceremony celebrating the anniversary, her first public appearance in two weeks. Her refusal to back down on activist demands and her silence over the deaths of the three protesters turned grief into simmering rage. One fell after hanging a banner; at least one other, in an apparent suicide, left a message on a wall asking others to keep up the fight.As demonstrators began assaulting the complex, Chan grabbed futilely at those rushing to tackle pro-democracy lawmakers blocking the entrances.She and the lawmakers were worried. Public opinion could turn against the protesters. Someone could get hurt. Chan had been staffing aid stations and handing out food and water, all for one goal: “Safety first.”The breachProtesters smashed glass and poured into the Legislative Council, joining others who flooded in from a second breach. Watching from the side, one protester disagreed. They were too few, 19-year-old Daisy Chan worried, and the police presence was heavy.As hours passed, thousands more trickled into the plaza and a nearby roundabout. The police retreated into the building. Angry protesters shattered windows with carts, sledgehammers and metal barricades.Chan thought of three protesters who had died and of the Hong Kong leader’s refusal to meet the activists. Though she didn’t want to break in, she wanted to support the others. Hong Kong protesters, police clash as demonstrations target Chinese traders Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Hong Kong, Hong kong news, Hong Kong protest, Hong Kong legislature attack, Hong kong parliament attack, Hong Kong parliament protest, democracy protests Hong Kong, Hong Kong China, China Hong Kong, World news, Indian Express Policemen watch their surroundings as they patrol outside the Legislative Council in Hong Kong on Thursday, July 4, 2019. (AP)It was almost noon on Monday when hundreds of protesters outside Hong Kong’s legislature voted to break in. By 9 p.m., when they finally pried open a metal security curtain that led inside, Chan believed nothing could assuage their anger.“You’ve been standing at the entrance for eight hours!” she recalled shouting at other protesters perched on a fence by a second entrance. “The police have already retreated. If you want to get in, if you want to do what you want to do, you should get in now!”Hong Kong, Hong kong news, Hong Kong protest, Hong Kong legislature attack, Hong kong parliament attack, Hong Kong parliament protest, democracy protests Hong Kong, Hong Kong China, China Hong Kong, World news, Indian Express Hong Kong: Damage in the lobby of the Legislative Council following a break-in by protesters is seen during a media tour, Wednesday, July 3, 2019, in Hong Kong. (AP)Chan and three other protesters, including two who aided others outside the building but didn’t enter, told their story to The Associated Press this week. They said years of feeling ignored drove them to desperation in the city of 7.4 million, a semi-autonomous Chinese territory whose independent legal system is guaranteed for 28 more years and already is threatened. They explained why, on the same day that hundreds of thousands of others marched in a peaceful protest, they were driven to wreak havoc inside Hong Kong’s legislature in scenes that shocked the world. Now they await the consequences.A historic dayMonday was the 22nd anniversary of the former British colony’s return to China. The protesters were angry. For three weeks, they had tried to get the government’s attention by blocking streets, defacing police headquarters and occupying government offices. Along with more peaceful demonstrators, they opposed the government’s attempt to change extradition laws to allow suspects to be sent to China for trial, but felt ignored. Related News Hong Kong tourism, hotel occupancy falls as protests drag on More Explained Advertising After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Hong Kong, Hong kong news, Hong Kong protest, Hong Kong legislature attack, Hong kong parliament attack, Hong Kong parliament protest, democracy protests Hong Kong, Hong Kong China, China Hong Kong, World news, Indian Express Damage to the offices of the Legislative Council following a break-in by protesters is seen during a media tour, Wednesday, July 3, 2019, in Hong Kong. (AP)Chan swung into action. Two weeks earlier, during marches in mid-June, she had formed a “resource station” team with about a dozen protesters, one of many that coalesced to help with protest logistics. They coordinated on Telegram, an encrypted messaging app.Chan wanted to know how to direct her group next. She called a Hong Kong legislator _ whose name she wouldn’t disclose _ and got floor plans and a warning to leave lawmaker offices and the library untouched.Chan walked into the complex with another member of her team, Nick, and began scouting the second floor for police. After finding none, she shouted orders on a walkie-talkie to her team: Smash security cameras, shatter hard drives. Seize the control room. And protect the library, which contained priceless historical artifacts.Hong Kong, Hong kong news, Hong Kong protest, Hong Kong legislature attack, Hong kong parliament attack, Hong Kong parliament protest, democracy protests Hong Kong, Hong Kong China, China Hong Kong, World news, Indian Express In this photo taken July 1, 2019, protesters use a cart to break through the glass panel of the Legislative Council in Hong Kong. (AP)“Destroy what is needed. Keep what is needed,” said Nick, explaining they wanted to minimize damage while making their point and protect protesters from surveillance. “We attacked only things that are iconic. We know what we are fighting for.”They scouted up to the fifth floor, then headed to the control room on the ground floor. They stopped by the library and left a note asking protesters to leave it unharmed.Other protesters tore down portraits of pro-Beijing lawmakers. They spray-painted Hong Kong’s emblem black, smashed elevators, plucked cameras out of ceilings and scrawled slogans calling for free elections.“You taught me that peaceful protests are useless,” read one, sprayed by the entrance to the council’s main chamber.Political awakeningChan, Nick and two others in the resource station interviewed by AP didn’t always think peaceful protests were useless. The failure of Hong Kong’s pro-democracy Umbrella Movement, which all four participated in, changed their minds.Chan was 14 when she saw violence erupt on her family television screen: masked police firing tear gas into crowds of students in September 2014.Until then, Chan had been a regular Hong Kong schoolgirl. She liked baking pastries and dreamed of being a chef. Her parents ran a grocery store. She didn’t think much about politics.The images of police pepper-spraying protesters shocked her.“I thought it was very insane,” Chan said. “They were just sitting.”Days later, she was on the streets, participating in her first demonstration.Nick, who only gave his first name because of concerns about being arrested, was a freshman in college. His father owned a car dealership, enough for a middle-class living. Classmates buzzed about the movement on social media. Anger at Beijing’s decision to pre-screen candidates for the most recent Hong Kong elections spoke to Nick, who felt the Chinese government ignored the desires of the city’s people. He hit the streets, cutting class and camping out for weeks.When the Umbrella Movement ended with no changes after 79 days, they were crushed.“It showed that even if you play peaceful, sitting on the streets, the government won’t care about it,” Nick said. “In their point of view, you’re just a bunch of people sitting on the streets.”After graduating in 2016, Nick found a job as a nurse at a weight-loss clinic, then one at a call center, then another at a PR agency. The pay was terrible, a little over $1,300 a month in one of the most expensive cities in the world. He quit last year and became a freelance photographer, shooting weddings and concerts.Nick wanted to live freely, to forget about politics and live his life. He dreamed of opening his own artist commune in an abandoned industrial building.But he was struggling to survive, let alone thrive.“There’s not much hope left in Hong Kong,” said Nick, now 24. “We just want a small place as our home, but we can’t afford it. We’re desperate.”Year after year, they felt the walls close in: the disappearance of five booksellers specializing in sensitive topics forbidden on the mainland. Chinese immigration officers in a Hong Kong train station, the terminus of a new high-speed rail link with China. A draft law criminalizing disrespect for the Chinese national anthem.The proposed changes to the extradition laws were the last straw. The draft legislation said it wouldn’t extradite for political crimes, that it was limited to serious offenses punishable by seven years in prison. But to Nick, Lam’s promises ran hollow.“I can’t trust the government,” he said. “They give whatever China wants.”By the time protests erupted again this year, their resolve had hardened.This time, they donned masks and helmets, and braced themselves for demonstrations more violent than the Umbrella Movement.“In China … you just speak one thing wrong, you will be put in jail,” Chan said. “Can you imagine in 28 years, what will Hong Kong be? Nobody knows.”The escapeIt was almost midnight on Monday when Chan and Nick heard others cry out, “The police are coming!”Nick wanted to stay and occupy the council chambers. Other protesters had started building barricades and stockpiling food, preparing for a prolonged battle with police.But there were too few of them. In the chamber, the protesters voted to leave. Chan headed outside to keep watch. Nick ran from room to room looking for protesters, yelling at them, “police are coming, don’t be left behind!”They fled the ransacked building as police closed in and caught a minibus across Hong Kong’s harbor. Some found rooms in a hostel, while others headed home.At 4 a.m., they watched on their phones as Lam stepped out for a news conference, condemning the break-in as an “extreme use of violence” that stood in contrast to a separate, largely peaceful march the same day.Nick was expecting Lam’s response. What he wasn’t expecting was how upset some of the reporters seemed to him, one asking Lam if she thought she had a place in heaven after ignoring the three deaths. He said she brushed off the question.“They’re blaming the protesters” for breaking windows, Nick said. “But there are three people dead. . If you put it on a scale, I think three lives are more important than three (pieces of) glass.”China’s foreign ministry later condemned the occupation and vandalization of the legislature as “serious illegal acts that trample on the rule of law and endanger social order.”Since then, the group has moved from one friend’s house to another to avoid police while contacting lawyers, preparing themselves for arrest. The members of their resource station met at a hotel restaurant on Tuesday evening and decided to speak to the press.Yes, they were scared. Yes, they might get caught. But for five years they felt they had tried everything, and concluded the only tactic that worked was force. Advertising Best Of Express Taking stock of monsoon rain last_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on Hong Kong Protesters say storming of legislature born of desperation,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

Duke University settles research misconduct lawsuit for 1125 million

first_img By Science News StaffMar. 25, 2019 , 1:50 PM Duke University settles research misconduct lawsuit for $112.5 million uschools/istockphoto “This settlement, which results primarily from willful misconduct that took place in one laboratory, but which affected the work of many more researchers, should not diminish the life-changing and life-saving work that takes place at every day at Duke,” said Duke University President Vincent Price in the statement. “Our difficulties in ferreting out and ending such misconduct remind us that important work remains to be done.”Duke’s new Advisory Panel on Research Integrity and Excellence, to be chaired by pediatric microbiologist and former research dean of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, Ann Arvin, will examine ways of “improving the structure and function of research administration, with a focus on promoting research integrity,” the statement says. It is expected to provide its recommendations to Price by 30 June. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Duke University will pay $112.5 million to the U.S. government to settle a lawsuit brought by a former employee who alleged that the university included falsified data in applications and reports for federal grants worth nearly $200 million. The university will also take several steps “to improve the quality and integrity of research conducted on campus,” including the creation of a new advisory panel that will provide recommendations to the president, the Durham, North Carolina, institution said in a statement released today.Late last year, ScienceInsider reported that Duke and federal prosecutors had moved to settle the case, but no details were available. It had drawn close attention from other universities, in large part because it involved a federal whistleblower law, the False Claims Act, that has rarely been used to address scientific misconduct. Under the law, Duke biologist Joseph Thomas, who filed the lawsuit in 2014, could receive as much as 30% of any settlement reached between the United States and the university. (RetractionWatch has reported Thomas will receive $33.8 million.)Thomas alleged that Duke biologist Erin Potts-Kant—a co-author on numerous papers that are now retracted—included fraudulent data in 60 grant reports and funding applications to U.S. agencies. “Duke discovered the possible research misconduct in 2013 after [Potts-Kant] was fired for embezzling money from the university, which also occurred over the same period,” the university noted in a statement released today. Potts-Kants “eventually pled guilty to two counts of forgery and paid restitution to Duke.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on Duke University settles research misconduct lawsuit for 1125 million,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More

IDSA guidelines Review by ID physician improves outcomes for outpatient parenteral antimicrobial

first_img OPAT vancomycin should be monitored closely throughout the course of treatment for adverse events as one study found 42 percent of patients developed nephrotoxicity (kidney damage) after 14 days on therapy. If nephrotoxicity develops, options include lowering the dose or stopping the vancomycin and switching to another medication such as daptomycin. In patients with no history of allergy to antimicrobials in the same class, the first dose of a new IV antimicrobial may be given at home under the supervision of a health care worker who is trained to manage an allergic reaction. In patients receiving OPAT antimicrobials for two weeks or less, it is acceptable to deliver the medication using a midline catheter in the arm rather than via a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) or central venous catheter. If a patient with a PICC develops a blood clot, it is not necessary to remove and replace the catheter if anticoagulation is started, the catheter is well-positioned and arm pain and swelling have decreased. Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 14 2018Before patients receive intravenous (IV) antimicrobial infusion therapy outside of the hospital – whether at home, a doctor’s office or a skilled nursing facility – an infectious diseases (ID) specialist should review the order to ensure the most appropriate treatment, suggest updated guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Once they begin receiving outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT), patients should be monitored regularly, note the guidelines, which are being published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.OPAT has long been the standard of care to treat an infection that requires IV antimicrobials because it is less expensive than hospital-based treatment and is preferred by most patients. Since the previous guidelines were published in 2004, three large studies have found this strategy to be safe: there is no difference in the number of adverse events related to OPAT compared to hospital-administered IV antimicrobial therapy.Additionally, new research underscores the value of review by an ID physician, nurse or pharmacist before starting OPAT, noting that it is associated with a lower risk of hospital readmission. In many cases the ID specialist will recommend an oral instead of an IV antimicrobial. Studies show up to 39 percent of OPAT patients can be switched from IV to oral antimicrobials and also note that as many as 1 in 10 patients don’t need an antimicrobial at all. One study found an ID specialist-led stewardship program reduced pediatric OPAT orders by 24 percent, without increasing readmissions.”The majority of patients referred for OPAT therapy do need it, but in many cases an oral antimicrobial would do the job. Given the growing worldwide problem with antimicrobial overuse and resistance, any opportunity to de-escalate these drugs is critically important,” said Anne H. Norris, MD, guidelines co-chair and associate professor of clinical medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. “Not only does this provide good stewardship of antimicrobials, but lowers costs and potentially improves patients’ well-being. It’s always better to avoid IV access if possible, and the narrower spectrum oral antimicrobials kill off fewer healthy bacteria than broader spectrum agents.”Related StoriesStudy analyzes high capacity of A. baumannii to persist on various surfacesBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryMathematical model helps quantify metastatic cell behaviorNewer research also suggests patients should have regular blood tests while receiving OPAT to monitor for toxicity and ensure the drug levels are adequate. Although there is no definitive evidence regarding how often that should occur, most patients are tested weekly, said Dr. Norris.Other new recommendations in the guideline include: Source:https://www.idsociety.org/news–publications-new/articles/2018/id-specialist-input-improves-outcomes-for–outpatient-parenteral-antimicrobial-therapy-new-idsa-guidelines/last_img read more

Written by : , No Comments on IDSA guidelines Review by ID physician improves outcomes for outpatient parenteral antimicrobial,Category: qhaktdjf- Read More
Page 1 of 791 2 3 4 5 79